PDF Î BOOK Kingdoms of Faith FREE µ GOPROLED

TEXT è A New History of Islamic Spain ´ Brian A Catlos

A magisterial myth dispelling history of Islamic Spain spanning the millennium between the founding of Islam in the seventh century and the final expulsion of Spain's Muslims in the seventeenth In Kingdoms of Faith award winning historian Brian A Catlos rewrites the history of Islamic Spain from the ground up evoking the cultural splendor of al Andalus while offering an authoritative new interpretation of the forces that shaped it Prior accounts have portrayed Islamic Spain as a paradise of enlightened tolerance or the site where civilizations clashed Catlos taps a wide array of primary sources to paint acomplex portrait showing how Muslims Christians and Jews together built a sophisticated civilization that transformed the Western world even as they waged relentless war against each other and their coreligionists Religion was often the language of conflict but seldom its cause a lesson we would do well to learn in our own time Good read covers all the topics and the detail given is ok Explains what happens over the years and how the Muslims left Spain

EPUB Kingdoms of Faith

Kingdoms of Faith A New History of Islamic SpainA magisterial myth dispelling history of Islamic Spain spanning the millennium between the founding of Islam in the seventh century and the final expulsion of Spain's Muslims in the seventeenth In Kingdoms of Faith award winning historian Brian A Catlos rewrites the history of Islamic Spain from the ground up evoking the cultural splendor of al Andalus while offering an authoritative new interpretation of the forces that shaped it Prior accounts have portrayed Islamic Spain as a paradise of enlightened tolerance or the site where civilizations clashed Catlos taps a wide array of primary sources to paint acomplex portrait showing how Muslims Christians and Jews together built a sophisticated civilization that transformed the Western world even as they waged relentless war against each other and their coreligionists Religion was often the language of conflict but seldom its cause a lesson we would do well to learn in our own time Not bad; scholarly well written But the author does not give proper sources for his information For example page 278 mentions that the Jewish thinker Maimonides had feigned conversion to Islam to emigrate to Fez Where is Professor Catlos's source? I asked my Rabbi an expert in Jewish history a Rosh Kollel in a prestigious yeshiva author of innumerable books if that's true The answer was paraphrasing 'It could be but he never heard that' Enjoyed reading this though and was able to improve my vocabulary Looked up the words animism chancery minaret palatine liminal palanuin and dromedary

Brian A Catlos ´ A New History of Islamic Spain KINDLE

PDF Î BOOK Kingdoms of Faith FREE µ GOPROLED É ❴PDF / Epub❵ ☄ Kingdoms of Faith: A New History of Islamic Spain Author Brian A Catlos – Goproled.co.uk A magisterial myth dispelling history of Islamic Spain spanning the millennium between the founding of Islam in the seventh century and the final expulA magisterial myth dispelling history of Islamic Spain spanning the millennium between the founding of Islam in the seventh century and the final expulsion of Spain's Muslims in the seventeenth In Kingdoms of Faith award winning historian Brian A Catlos rewrites the history of Islamic Spain from the ground up evoking the cultural splendor of al Andalus while offering an authoritative new interpretation of the forces that shaped it Prior accounts have portrayed Islamic Spain as a paradise of enlightened tolerance or the site where civilizations clashed Catlos taps a wide array of primary sources to paint acomplex portrait showing how Muslims Christians and Jews together built a sophisticated civilization that transformed the Western world even as they waged relentless war against each other and their coreligionists Religion was often the language of conflict but seldom its cause a lesson we would do well to learn in our own time This book tells the story of Al Andalus from the first penetration of Muslims in the 8th century til the final exile roughly 800 years later In recent years for modern reasons Al Andalus has been held up as a society of great religious tolerance that led to a great cultural flowering which was suelched when monomaniacal Christian kings re conuered the Iberian peninsula and set everything back to the dark ages I always felt this view was a little too rose colored This book comes from the same perspective and in a neutral manner looks at the whole picture which is one of constant raiding and skirmishing and divisions and alliances within and between communities and cultures and sects There was a great deal of realpolitik involved in the attitude of the leaders of one society toward others within it and without Religiosity was often set aside but not always There was cruelty on both sides and magnanimity on both sides Trust was provisional and short lived everywhere Euality was in short supply especially as compared to slavery which was as endemic and vital to the economy of al Andalus as the antebellum south of the United StatesThe history is told in a straightforward chronological fashion The emphasis is on the geopolitical ie who was in charge of what territory at any given time and how the boundaries changed as time went on which was of course through military conflict conuest and defeat As it is the story of Al Andalus it is mainly told from the perspective of the Muslim rulers with the Christians very much in the background until the 15th centuryMy only negative response to the book is that it is a bit tedious to read In its 400 pages there must be over 100 battles and over 200 rulers or pretenders Every geopolitical development gets a couple of pages and then we move on to the next It's a little repetitious although I don't know how to tell it any other way in that amount of pages If you've read any of John Julius Norwich's histories say of Venice or Sicily this is similar but a little drier It's very non academic and devoid of footnotes and endnotes fbow Also for this Western reader the author's fidelity to Arabic naming was a further obstacle if you like to read fast as I do; the Arabic rulers' names have a lot of similarity and I often had to slow down to be sure which of them the author was referring to at a given moment