One Two Three Four Epub ê The Beatles in Time

Text ↠ The Beatles in Time Ô Craig Brown

SHORTLISTED FOR THE BAILLIE GIFFORD PRIZE 2020From the award winning author of Maam Darling 99 Glimpses of Princess Margaret comes a fascinating hilarious kaleidoscopic biography of the Fab FourJohn Updike compared them to the sun coming out on an Easter morning Bob Dylan introduced them to drugs The Duchess of Windsor adored them Noel Coward despised them JRR Tolkien snubbed them The Rolling Stones copied them Loenard Bernstein admired them Muhammad Ali called them little sissies Successive Prime Ministers sucked up to them No one has remained unaffected by the music of The Beatles As ueen Elizabeth II observed on her golden wedding anniversary Think what we would have missed if we had never heard The BeatlesOne Two Three Four traces the chance fusion of the four key elements that made up The Beatles fire John water Paul air George and earth Ringo It also tells the bizarre and often unfortunate tales of the disparate and colourful people within their orbit among them Fred Lennon Yoko Ono the Maharishi Aunt Mimi Helen Shapiro the con artist Magic Alex Phil Spector their psychedelic dentist John Riley and their failed nemesis Det Sgt Norman PilcherFrom the bestselling author of Maam Darling comes a kaleidoscopic mixture of history etymology diaries autobiography fan letters essays parallel lives party lists charts interviews announcements and stories One Two Three Four joyfully echoes the frenetic hurly burly of an era Most books about the ’60s are bright and bubbly affairs full of “I was here” and “I was there” and “this was happening” and “that was happening” and uite right it really was but the first hundred pages of One Two Three Four are a dour and depressing affair flitting back and forth in very brief chapters of three to five ish pages between author Craig Brown’s pilgrimage to various fake shrines and phoney nostalgia events in the present day to a slow methodical plod from the Cavern and Hamburg to the end of it ‘it’ being the rise and fall of the greatest pop band of all time the Beatles or “the Peadles” as Brown repeatedly tells us the Germans call them—okay boomer The author specialises in snobbish but cruelly accurate satirical ‘diaries’ in Private Eye magazine and here turns his attention to some of the most important music of the 20th centuryThere have been many many books on aspects of the Beatles of course and one virtue of this late entry is that it is able to collect various versions of incidents from its predecessors and collate them together Conseuently we get numerous versions of Lennon beating up a record company employee at Paul’s birthday party all of which ‘dally with the truth’ but offer slightly alternate versions of the same violence and all the assorted speculation of John’s holiday in Spain with the group’s gay manager Brian Epstein Did they or didn’t they? Like many men aggressively virulent towards homosexuality Lennon may have been firmly in the closet and genuinely fearful of any curious feelings Interestingly not one account by this account appears to have considered the possibility that in an era when holidays abroad were extremely rare for the British working class he may just have naively accepted the invite from his hopeful boss for the experience of a foreign holiday in the sun like some innocent office secretary accompanying her sneaky boss to Bournemouth or Eastbourne for a ‘conference’ In just a few short months the Beatles would own the world and indeed for a year literally own several Greek islands they never bothered to visitAs the book starts die hard Beatles admirers will be even less amused than the frosty couple from the National Trust who are sent up mercilessly for their attempts to stop the author cashing in on their own crass attempts to cash in Brown not only hilariously ignores all their futile admonishments not to repeat their stories he includes them with the stories That there is a shabby Beatles heritage industry in full flow today is relentlessly hammered home in between time travels to the drab dowdy Britain of the early 1960s In my first sitting with this book read over a week I had been invited to wallow in the darkest aspects of Lennon and McCartney’s upbringing and adolescence the sualor of Hamburg and its inadeuate disappointing sexual experiences with added thuggery and vomit the traffic accident death of Lennon’s vibrant and sexy young mother the betrayal and attempted suicide of Pete Best the mockery of John’s marriage to the easily satisfied Cynthia the possibility of gay hang ups in the group in an era when homosexuality was scary scornful and illegal and the bitter resentment of every other band in Britain We all know that John Lennon was a deeply unpleasant and damaged person and that Pete Best was cruelly dumped on from a great height and for most of us that is the extent to which we are prepared to deal with the dark side of a pop group who when their bright catchy music bursts forth bring instant sunlight and happiness and to those who lived during the period wistful nostalgic delight Nobody wants a whitewash but surely there was the occasional upside some good times? Brown’s talent for pinpointing and mocking the most pathetic and cruelly observed aspects of Britain in the ‘60s is ill suited for fannish archaeologyBy page 100 everything changes and One Two Three Four becomes a different book We learn again what everybody my age has known all our lives in 1963 the Beatles smashed Britain beginning the year with laughable local gigs that were the euivalent of barn dances and private parties and ending it with Sunday Night at the London Palladium the Albert Hall and the Royal Variety Performance the three biggest gigs in the country In 1964 they smashed America and the world And they deserved to as artists if not always as individuals But would any other four young men have behaved in any other way? Too much too soon? Not exactly but a heavy load to carry at any age It was like winning the lottery but earning itFrom hereon the book is exhilarating There are endless anecdotes with Cliff Richard still sulking years later the Ronettes future murderer Phil Spector even then clearly deranged creepy bumptious bully Ed Sullivan out of his depth the publicity stunt with Mohammed Ali with all concerned worlds apart and reluctant to participate the hypocrite Frank Sinatra doing a replay of his Elvis moment nuclear contempt followed by shameless sucking up and Bob Dylan fatefully introducing them to drugs Other highlights are provided by the helpless haters haplessly raging incoherently spluttering in respected journals whose publishers are now surely embarrassed at what they printed so brutally spiteful silly and out of touch were the reviews Brown placidly digs it all up and mercilessly empties the shovel onto the table Bad reviews for the blatantly brilliant are so much fun than the prescient ones; see also Elvis And there are wonderful uotes from the other side of what was called ‘the generation gap’“When I think about ‘She Loves You’ and how much I loved that song how new it sounded and how happy it made me feel to hear it I think about how much it represented the mirage of a possible future one that was joyful and interesting than my lonely and borderline grim childhood with its homework and tests and mean girls and stupid boys and parents who worried about everything and got angry over nothing”“‘She Loves You’ signalled the first time in my life I heard a song that seemed to speak directly to me and not to adults I still think it is the greatest song ever written For me it is and always will be the song that changed the world I love that song I absolutely love it And with a love like that you know you should be glad”Hyperbole? I’m a true cynic but I honestly think not The Beatles’ early songs truly lift the spirits and signal the beginning of the end for an old way of thinking the beginning of a belief that the world really could be a better place that told my generation that you didn’t have to be angry petty bitter and spiteful in old age that there might may be something else in the future Some forget and have become what they despised but many of my generation became tolerant and understanding and fun parents because of pop and when the world is a better and brighter place for all ages it’s because of the Beatles and the ‘60s in general Racism prudishness and greed don’t have to be the default setting It’s good to be happy And even in the darkness and foolishness of the 21st century those songs can still lift the spirits of all age groups and reduce overly complicated emotions and misguided opinions to the raw basic truthsBy around page 300 the shine is off and both the Beatles and the ’60s are in freefall There is the lacklustre meeting with Elvis their fateful encounter with hallucinogenics the MBEs John’s ghastly Aunt Mimi egos and houses too big the end of the live performances even the Beatles couldn’t hear their own music over the hysteria the tax dodge company Apple that lost than it saved and the death of the hippie dream after the reality check of Haight Ashbury “It certainly showed me what was happening in the drug culture” said George “It wasn’t what I’d thought—spiritual awakening and being artistic—it was like alcoholism like any addiction That was the turning point for me—that’s when I went right off the whole drug cult” And straight into the Transcendental Meditation cultBrown makes the valid point that the Beatles were selling nostalgia even by the late ‘60s in their clothes themes and stylistic flourishes For guys credited with changing the world which they certainly did Lennon and McCartney spent a vast amount of time looking back Perhaps that’s how they did it they were selling the past as the future a sort of best of both worlds like Bond and Batman Awfully just as they lost Brian Epstein their own Colonel Parker they had fallen into the clutches of a far insidious one the self styled ‘Maharishi’ con man extraordinaire Although a humorist and satirist by profession Brown nails scum like him Magic Alex and Manson simply by bluntly relating the detail in facts and uotes saving the funny stuff for the funny stuff and giving us the not so funny stuff straight He breaks the rule with Yoko laying into this easy but deserving target mercilessly having found her Twitter account Now 86 she dispenses fortune cookie wisdom in one liners Asking for the same sort of advice in return the internet has a field day “Avoid Tesco Value Rice Crispies they’re really horrible”“A decent pair of oven gloves is worth a thousand towels”“Don’t split up the Beatles when they have a few albums in them” “She was unbudgeable in her instinct that in the world of art skill would soon be edged out by audacity” writes Brown “For decades afterwards Yoko Ono would be credited as a pioneer of conceptual art even though Duchamp’s idea that anything humdrum may be transformed into a work of art simply by placing it in a gallery was by then half a century old” But there is still the glory of Sergeant Pepper to cheer us up a true ground breaker Lennon’s motivation for writing “I Am the Walrus” a satire of pretentious critics and academics trying to read deep meaning into his lyrics but which served only to unleash a further frenzy of analysis and the fan letters are hilarious“I told my mother that I can’t imagine a world without the Beatles and she said she could easily”“I have 826 pictures of the Beatles and am just beginning”“If my mother answers hang up”The best book on the Beatles and one of the best books on popular culture and the 1960s in general remains the late Ian MacDonald’s magnificent Revolution in the Head which can usually be bought for a fraction of the price of this I genuinely understood the Beatles’ music better at the end of it and for someone completely musically incompetent other than a good pair of ears that was uite an achievement I shall certainly have a better affinity with “When I’m 64” in a few weeks time—if I make it But this is a great fun read and close behind a doorstep of a book with big type and short punchy chapters Finally tip of the hat to the Mike Sammes Singers I had no idea “learning learning all ze time”Craig Brown observes far too much and far too accurately Sometimes it falls into the category of Too Much Information We know it wasn’t uite like the zany news footage and the pop mags Craig there’s some fascinating spin on Lennon’s violence between what he really said and what was said to the press but don’t spoil the Beatles for us at this late date If we put our heads in the sand we can’t hear the music

Doc One Two Three Four

One Two Three Four The Beatles in Time Shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford prizeSHORTLISTED FOR THE BAILLIE GIFFORD PRIZE 2020From the award winning author of Maam Darling 99 Glimpses of Princess Margaret comes a fascinating hilarious kaleidoscopic biography of the Fab FourJohn Updike compared them to the sun coming out on an Easter morning Bob Dylan introduced them to drugs The Duchess of Windsor adored them Noel Coward despised them JRR Tolkien snubbed them The Rolling Stones copied them Loenard Bernstein admired them Muhammad Ali called them little sissies Successive Prime Ministers sucked up to them No one has remained unaffected by the music of The Beatles As ueen Elizabeth II observed on her golden wedding anniversary Think what we would have missed if we had never heard The BeatlesOne Two Three Four traces the chance fusion of the four key elements that made up The Beatles fire John water Paul air George and earth Ringo It also tells the bizarre and often unfortunate tales of the disparate and colourful people within their orbit among them Fred Lennon Yoko Ono the Maharishi Aunt Mimi Helen Shapiro the con artist Magic Alex Phil Spector their psychedelic dentist John Riley and their failed nemesis Det Sgt Norman PilcherFrom the bestselling author of Maam Darling comes a kaleidoscopic mixture of history etymology diaries autobiography fan letters essays parallel lives party lists charts interviews announcements and stories One Two Three Four joyfully echoes the frenetic hurly burly of an era Like Craig Brown’s previous biography Ma’am Darling this book similarly uses a polychromatic style of letters anecdotes diary entries fan recollections musical analysis and personal memoir to create a rich textured multilayered history of the BeatlesI absolutely loved this book it’s a history of the Beatles without the boring bits It’s extremely funny and Craig Brown never misses a telling anecdote uite clearly not a fan of Oko Ono he has enormous fun at her expense brilliantly ridiculing her exploits Of course this is a brief overview so don’t expect detailed critiues of every album and there are some major omissions Linda McCartney doesn’t get a mention at all but I have never read such an entertaining book on the Beatles In these dark and troubled times I can highly recommend this astonishing book A superb treat

Craig Brown Ô Shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford prize Ebook

One Two Three Four Epub ê The Beatles in Time Ä [Read] ➯ One Two Three Four: The Beatles in Time: Shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford prize By Craig Brown – Goproled.co.uk SHORTLISTED FOR THE BAILLIE GIFFORD PRIZE 2020From the award winning author of Maam Darling 99 Glimpses of Princess Margaret comes a fascinating hilarSHORTLISTED FOR THE BAILLIE GIFFORD PRIZE 2020From the award winning author of Maam Darling 99 Glimpses of Princess Margaret comes a fascinating hilarious kaleidoscopic biography of the Fab FourJohn Updike compared them to the sun coming out on an Easter morning Bob Dylan introduced them to drugs The Duchess of Windsor adored them Noel Coward despised them JRR Tolkien snubbed them The Rolling Stones copied them Loenard Bernstein admired them Muhammad Ali called them little sissies Successive Prime Ministers sucked up to them No one has remained unaffected by the music of The Beatles As ueen Elizabeth II observed on her golden wedding anniversary Think what we would have missed if we had never heard The BeatlesOne Two Three Four traces the chance fusion of the four key elements that made up The Beatles fire John water Paul air George and earth Ringo It also tells the bizarre and often unfortunate tales of the disparate and colourful people within their orbit among them Fred Lennon Yoko Ono the Maharishi Aunt Mimi Helen Shapiro the con artist Magic Alex Phil Spector their psychedelic dentist John Riley and their failed nemesis Det Sgt Norman PilcherFrom the bestselling author of Maam Darling comes a kaleidoscopic mixture of history etymology diaries autobiography fan letters essays parallel lives party lists charts interviews announcements and stories One Two Three Four joyfully echoes the frenetic hurly burly of an era It's not easy to present the Beatles story from a fresh and different angle but this book does it in a fascinating and funny way I loved Brown's previous book on Princess Margaret and this is just as enjoyable However I also noticed a lot of careless mistakes in the text so in the unlikely event that Craig Brown or his publishers read this here are a few of them p65 Brian Epstein's family business was North End Music Stores not North East Music Storeschokengtitiktitikchokeng123 The New York folk music venue was 'Cafe Wha?' not Cafe Whatchokengtitiktitikchokeng259 Prime Minister Harold Wilson was not a fellow Liverpudlian he was from Huddersfield in Yorkshirechokengtitiktitikchokeng308 John and Aunt Mimi lived in Woolton not Waltonchokengtitiktitikchokeng363 The lyrics to Across the Universe are Jai Guru Dev not Jai Guru Devachokengtitiktitikchokeng389 The song It's Getting Better is not set in schoolchokengtitiktitikchokeng451 Across the Universe wasn't written in Indiachokengtitiktitikchokeng491 Two different lines from Hey Jude are mixed up so the point about mishearing the lyrics makes no sensechokengtitiktitikchokeng552 Paul has a cigarette in his right hand on the Abbey Road cover not his left handchokengtitiktitikchokeng575 Marital virtues should read martial virtues