FREE READER Í DOC Myths from Mesopotamia ☆ SHILLITO FELLOW IN ASSYRIOLOGY ORIENTAL INSTITUTE OXFORD SENIOR RESEARCH FELLOW STEPHANIE DALLEY

KINDLE Myths from Mesopotamia

FREE READER Í DOC Myths from Mesopotamia ☆ SHILLITO FELLOW IN ASSYRIOLOGY ORIENTAL INSTITUTE OXFORD SENIOR RESEARCH FELLOW STEPHANIE DALLEY × [Epub] ❦ Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, the Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others (OxforMade available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features including expert introductions by leading authorities voluminous notes to clarify the text up to date bibliographies for further study and muc Absolutely excellent edition Oxford Classics never fails There are gaps but that can't be helped but the one thing about Oxford Classics I hate is how they put the footnotes at the end rather than the bottom of the page often ruining the flow if you want to read them Seems pointless

Shillito Fellow in Assyriology Oriental Institute Oxford Senior Research Fellow Stephanie Dalley ´ TEXT

Is dashed through one moment of weakness Recent developments in Akkadian grammar and lexicography mean that this new translation complete with notes a glossary of deities place names and key terms and illustrations of the mythical monsters featured in the text will replace all other versions About the Series For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has For those with a genuine interest in both history and mythology This is definitely not a book for the casual readerThe myths are translated just as they are written on the cuneiform tablets which includes indications of missing and damaged lines of words so that the stories are often fragmented in many places You may find this frustrating but bear in mind this isn't the author trying to cheap you out of information it's just the sad reality of lost historyWhat remains of the text varies from the enthralling to the confusing and there were times when I would have liked Dalley to have explained a note or some sort of detailed afterword about each myth perhaps giving of an insight into her own interpretation of missing sections or the meaning of such abstract ideas as Gilgamesh losing his PukkuMekku which I am still unclear onAnother uibble is her decision to use the least detailed account of Ishtar's Descent despite telling us in the introduction that a much detailed version exists but not choosing to share it luckily it is online and it helps to explain Ishtar's motives far clearlyDespite the criticisms I did love reading this book I have been intoxicated by ancient Mesopotamia and its mythology which seems to be the precursor for some later Greek myths and especially biblical tales such as Noah's flood The gods are at once diplomatic uarrelsome merciful and violent as any other pagan pantheon you might read of which is to say they are humanIf you are intrigued to read some of the oldest known tales of human thought and religion and have a great deal of patience then this book will serve you well

DOC ↠ ´ Shillito Fellow in Assyriology Oriental Institute Oxford Senior Research Fellow Stephanie Dalley

Myths from Mesopotamia Creation the Flood Gilgamesh and Others Oxford World's ClassicsThe ancient civilization of Mesopotamia thrived between the rivers Tigris and Euphrates over 4000 years ago The myths collected here originally written in cuneiform on clay tablets include parallels with the biblical stories of the Creation and the Flood and the famous Epic of Gilgamesh the tale of a man of great strength whose heroic uest for immortality A great compilation of myths that represents the world the way Sumerians and Akkadians used to live with it's fears efforts and gloryAlso a good text to comprehend things related to the old testament in the Bible